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Topic: Soakaways in clay soil, ...they don't work< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
PavingSuperstore
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,17:33 QUOTE

What's the best option in this situation. Sewage treatment plant in place with Environment Agency approval to empty treated water into natural pond. Natural clay lined pond became black and smelly, so outlet pipe was extended to go to huge (approx. 144m3) soak away filled with rubble and gravel. Drainage pipe was used en route covered with matting and shingle etc to try and disperse some of the water on the way.  Area became mushy and smelly and pipe was dug up again and has now been extended further. It is currently sitting on top of the ground and the area fenced off, but the area is like a boggy marsh. The ground is clay, so drainage is far from good, but wherever the pipe is laid the water just doesn't soak away. Was thinking of using underground drainage tanks with holes for dispersion, but thought there could be a build up of gases which may cause a problem. If the water was a slow trickle it wouldn't be so bad, but when the treatment plant empties, it pumps for about 20 minutes. What's the answer?

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lutonlagerlout
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,18:12 QUOTE

when you say treatment plant do you mean a proper one or a klargester type tank?
big problem is folk move into a house that has had a septic tank for years that has never been emptied

the bacteria do all the work and the main tank is full of compost naturally breaking down

new people move in and start using bleach,and biological washing powders,this kills the bacteria and the outflow water suddenly stinks

flowjoe may have a better idea than me about all this

cheers LLL


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PavingSuperstore
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,18:31 QUOTE

It's a Balmoral cap 12 pumped system - it has an inner and outer chamber. The outer chamber has to be desludged each year and the the bubble diffuser in the inner chamber breaks down the solids leaving the liquid at the surface for pumping out when the level reaches the float switch. Have always used bleach and biological washing powders so would have thought the bacteria would be used to it by now.

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lutonlagerlout
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,18:54 QUOTE

it kills them
it sounds similar to a klargester " bulb type"
have you thought about harvesting certain waste-water and just letting the loos go into the tank?
cheers LLL


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msh paving
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,19:07 QUOTE

if that is a treatment plant, the water comming out can leagally be put into the water course, therefore no smell and dirty water.if this is happing there is something wrong in tank,is it in norwich? i could come and have a look for you ?I fit 3 of 4 a year and maintain 4  MSH :)

Edited by msh paving on 26 Nov. 2013,19:08

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PavingSuperstore
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,19:25 QUOTE

Harvesting might be an option, but I'm guessing would be quite a lot of work. Yes, it's Norwich area, sort of South West really. The planning approves putting it in the water course, but it's all ponds round here, so it just sits and stagnates. If you're passing at some stage, it would be good to know what we need to do even if we don't do it just yet. Are you Norwich based?

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msh paving
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,19:50 QUOTE

i live in kings lynn, spend a lot off time in watton,, so no far away   MSH :)

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msh paving
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,19:51 QUOTE

treated water is clean so wont stagnate...MSH :(

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PavingSuperstore
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,20:12 QUOTE

We're Hardingham, so not too far from Watton if you are ever in the area. It doesn't smell too good and is a grey colour, so can't be too good.....

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msh paving
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Posted: 26 Nov. 2013,20:39 QUOTE

pm   your fone number  and ill see what i can arrange  MSH :D

Edited by msh paving on 26 Nov. 2013,20:39

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Posted: 08 July 2015,12:31 QUOTE

Hi - new to this site and using all the really useful advice on the site and forum I'm in the process of installing my own lawn drainage into a soakaway and need some advice about the soakaway.  I've currently got a hole 2m long x 1m wide and around 1m deep but am still digging clay. When it rains it just becomes a shallow pond and I have to pump out before I can carry on working.  I was hoping that I'd have got through the clay by now and am wondering how far down I'll need to go before I get through the clay??
I'm now considering if I don't eventually break through, will making the hole big and deep enough create enough volume and pressure of water to slowly permeate the clay and disperse the water?

I've got two soakaway crates and am planning a fair surrounding of gravel to finish the pit off which is under a gravel path.
We are based in Cheshire and according to geological geekery sites and maps would indicate that we are in an area that shouldn't suffer from clay problems although quite a few people on the estate do suffer with bad drainage.

I'd appreciate any thoughts or advice anyone on here has.

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Forestboy1978
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Posted: 25 Oct. 2015,22:12 QUOTE

I've got a bit of a drainage conundrum. Basically put a fence in for a customer. Wants us to go back and install large raised beds out of sleepers and such. Won the quote, no problem. Got to demolish a shed and concrete base, a bit of soft landscaping and such. Easy.

Here's the problem... he's decided he wants to add to the quote. He has a perimeter path running around the house. Then there's a gap with grass, then some more patio of the same style with the shed on it. There's already a drainage issue with the water running of the path, breeching the grass gap and onto the patio/ hard standing and ponding on the are that the current shed is on.

This shed is being demolished and being replaced with a a summer house. Now, he wants me to bridge the grass gap between the perimeter path and hard standing and extend the end of the hard standing right to our fence at the back of the garden restricting flow even further. Ordinarily no problem, only this is gonna greatly exacerbate the drainage issue and yeah it's clay soil.

There must be an existing soakaway somewhere so perhaps I can channel to it but how does one go about finding such a thing without digging the whole place up?

I don't do patios per se, but this sort of thing just keeps happening. I don't like them, I don't want them, I don't have a digger so I end up digging them out by hand. Don't want to lose the other work though as it's more than it sounds.
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Posted: 26 Oct. 2015,08:08 QUOTE

Does the "soakaway  " take any downpipes etc thst you can rod along to get the distance. Judging by the water not draining it is likely the soakaway is shot anyway, if it was working in the first place with the heavy clay. You may have to use alternative means of drainage  :;):

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Forestboy1978
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Posted: 26 Oct. 2015,21:42 QUOTE

Yeah it does take downpipes I hadn't thought of that. However, I'm in line with your thinking that it clearly isn't up to the current task so perhaps installing another cell somewhere. Not sure if that's viable due to clay and also no digger. His patio just doesn't warrant that type of expense it's not very nice at all.

Could sell him a whole new patio ;-) NO!

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