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Topic: Rigid or flexible, Which is better for a sloping driveway< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
SB1066
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Posted: 11 Oct. 2019,17:36 QUOTE

Hello,

I have been working on my driveway, sorted out the drainage and put in an aco drain. I am just finishing haunching the borders and at the stage of picking the final product to use. I have opted for block pavers from natural paving. My question is...

My driveway is on a fairly decent slope and has a bend in it (can’t find a way to attach an image of my drive).Should I lay the pavers on a rigid or flexi bed?
I will mortar the first 2 edging courses and was thinking about an addition 2 rows of mortar at the bottom of the slope (before the bend) to act as re enforcement?!

Any thoughts, ideas or tips on this matter would be most helpful and cheers in advance!


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Tony McC
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Posted: 13 Oct. 2019,09:53 QUOTE

There's a thread in the Site Agent's section detailing how photies can be uploaded.

Unless it's a gradient in excess of 1:12 or thereabouts, you can use flexible construction, but plan for a series of regular intermediate restraining courses to minimise creep.


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SB1066
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Posted: 14 Oct. 2019,16:22 QUOTE

Hi Tony,

Thank you for the response. It is in excess of 1:12 at the steepest parts. Would it be feasible to lay the two flat(ish) areas in flexible construction and lay just the slope rigid, or does that complicate the matter?

Is there an ideal mix to use?!

Thanks again


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SB1066
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Posted: 14 Oct. 2019,16:30 QUOTE

[img]https://i.postimg.cc/ykDTFPg....mg]

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Tony McC
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Posted: 22 Oct. 2019,12:42 QUOTE

I can't see anything there that would make me want to use rigid construction. As long as you have well-constructed robust edge courses, you will be fine with standard, flexible construction throughout.

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SB1066
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Posted: 26 Oct. 2019,10:45 QUOTE

Hi Tony,

Thanks again for the response! The only concern I have is the steepest section is more like 1:8 perhaps even steeper.

I have laid and haunched the edges and will by haunting 2 edging courses as belt and braces.

A friend recommended using a full mixer of sand plus half a bag of cement to use as my screed? He used it on his drive and it seems solid.

I was also  planning on using a brush in jointing compound to finish?

Many Thanks


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Tony McC
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Posted: 29 Oct. 2019,12:33 QUOTE

Wrong and even wronger!


Flexible block paving should NEVER be laid over a sand/cement bed. It may be working now for your freind, but the driveway will not perform, or survive as long, as would a properly constrcutred flexible driveway.

And then flexible block paving should not be jointed with a brush-in mortar. It's a nonsense.


The simple rule we have followed for over a hundred years is "flexible on flexible: rigid on rigid."

If the pavement is to be flexible, then there's no binder (cement) in the bedding, and none in the jointing.

When the pavement is to be rigid, the bedding must be bound (a cement-based mortar) and so must the jointing, which should have sufficient strength to support the poaving as a whole.


I still see no need for rigid paving on your project, but I would strongly recommend intermediate restraining courses. However, if you want to use the rigid option, then you must ensure the build-up is correct, so NOT a thin scattering of sand and cement over a flexible sub-base, but a proper rigid base, with a rigid (mortar) laying course and then rigid *strong* jointing.


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